Pamela Druckerman is the author of three books including Bringing Up Bebé: One American Mother Discovers the Wisdom of French Parenting. She’s also a contributing opinion writer at the International New York Times.

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Decoding the Rules of Conversation

My kids have recently picked up a worrying French slang word: bim (pronounced “beam”). It’s what children say in the schoolyard here after they’ve proved someone wrong, or skewered him with a biting remark. English equivalents like “gotcha” or “booyah” don’t carry the same sense of gleeful vanquish, and I doubt British or American kids

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The Clutter Cure’s Illusory Joy

I recently discovered the secret to livening up even the dullest conversation: Introduce the topic of clutter. Everyone I meet seems to be waging a passionate, private battle against their own stuff, and they perk up as soon as you mention it. Read the full story here.

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Just Another Parisian

About four years ago, a friend invited me to lunch with some cartoonists from Charlie Hebdo, the French satirical newspaper. Charlie was looking for new writers. I was looking for work. Read the full story here.

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Talking to Kids About Sex

One of the many problems with parenting is that kids keep changing. Just when you’re used to one stage, they zoom into another. I realized this was happening again recently, when my 8-year-old asked me about babies. She knows they grow in a mother’s belly, but how do they get in there to begin with?

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How to Be French

I have an unusual item on my to-do list, wedged between home repairs and unwritten thank-you notes: Become French. I’ve begun the long process of gathering documents to apply for French citizenship. I’ll remain American, too, of course. I’d be a dual citizen. But becoming French would bring perks. I could vote in French and

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A Cure for Hyper-Parenting

I recently spent the afternoon with some Norwegians who are making a documentary about French child-rearing. Why would people in one of the world’s most successful countries care how anyone else raises kids? In Norway “we have brats, child kings, and many of us suffer from hyper-parenting. We’re spoiling them,” explained the producer, a father

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Bring Up Bébé

Bébé(s) in Paperback!

It’s with great joy that I announce the launch/publication/birth of Bringing Up Bébé in paperback. This new edition includes Bébé Day By Day: 100 Keys to French Parenting. So let’s just say it’s twins. I hope you like them. Amazon Barnes and Noble Indie Bound  

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Learning How to Exert Self-Control

Learning How to Exert Self-Control

NOT many Ivy League professors are associated with a type of candy. But Walter Mischel, a professor of psychology at Columbia, doesn’t mind being one of them. “I’m the marshmallow man,” he says, with a modest shrug. Read the full story here

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Miami Grows Up. A Little.

Miami Grows Up. A Little.

IF you had asked me what I wanted when I was 12 years old, I probably would have said, “to marry a plastic surgeon.” You can hardly blame me: I was growing up in Miami. Read the full story here.  

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The French Do Buy Books

The French Do Buy Books. Real Books.

One of the maddening things about being a foreigner in France is that hardly anyone in the rest of the world knows what’s really happening here. They think Paris is a Socialist museum where people are exceptionally good at eating small bits of chocolate and tying scarves. Read the full story here.

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